Living Abroad with Kids in Tow

If you’ve been following International Man for some time, you know that we advise internationalization on all fronts – assets, income and person. While it can be relatively easy to move some assets abroad (although, less so by the day for Americans), it is understandably more difficult to move one’s self abroad. And even more so to move one’s family. Today we chat with an entrepreneur who left America for Costa Rica in 2009, and did so with his wife and kids in tow.

The Perils and Profits of Emerging Markets Investing

For decades, Karim has been at the forefront of emerging and frontier market opportunities and last month, he released a book in which he reviewed 15 such markets, including a few not familiar to most Western investors. In this guest article, he briefly analyses the emerging markets everyone already knows about but also two others that if aren’t yet on your radar, are highly worth considering.

All This Fuss About A Fiat Dollar

Shortly after the founding of the United States, the Constitution made it clear that the government was not to be in the business of printing paper currency. What gave the Founding Fathers the keen insight to incorporate such an important point into such a fundamental document? Jeff Thomas explains.

On the Ground in Colombia (Part 3)

Over the course of the last two weeks we’ve followed frequent traveler Mark Svoboda as he shared his findings on Colombia. Today Mark wraps up his report with the different residency options available in the country.

The Problem With Political Parties

It should come as no surprise that many of our readers are independent-thinkers, exceptionally freedom-minded and fiercely libertarian. The smaller the government, the better so far as they are concerned. Indeed, some believe there should be no government at all. That said, today’s feature might be of interest to the entire spectrum of political persuasion even if for just a lark: a small government without parties – just independents (supposedly) working for their constituents rather than vested interests. Jeff Thomas explains…

On the Ground in Colombia (Part 2)

Last week Mark Svoboda introduced us to Colombia, a country he toured last year as part of the search for his next perfect homeland. Today Mark continues with his comments on the country, including lifestyle in Bogotá and Medellín, transportation, as well as the most common concern for Colombia: safety.

Set Up Shop in Chile and Get $40,000

What if you were paid $40,000 to travel to another country, get a 1-year visa, and work on your technology related business? That’s exactly what Start-Up Chile – an initiative started in 2010 by the Chilean government – makes possible, offering grants to small teams of entrepreneurs to come work on their ideas in Santiago. It’s all part of the country’s bid to become “the Silicon Valley of South America,” and today we chat with Kevin Kent, a Chicago entrepreneur who recently received a grant.

Beating the Piñata

The process of tax collection can be compared to that of opening a piñata: one beats the thing and with, sufficient effort, gets a stream of goodies to fall out. Yet more effort = more goodies. With enough effort, every piece of coin, candy and food is shaken out – almost always by destroying the piñata in the process.

On the Ground in Colombia (Part 1)

Over the last several months we’ve had the opportunity to meet Mark Svoboda, a Russian-by-birth and current American resident looking for his next “Shangri-La” around the world. So far he has reported on Malaysia, Singapore, and Tanzania. Today Mark heads to South America for his findings on Colombia…

The Burning Barn

Expatriation, both of assets and oneself, is a common thread in many articles and forum posts on the International Man Network and elsewhere. Today, Jeff Thomas talks about the opposite side of the equation – repatriation – returning to one’s original country.

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